Sentence.

So Yu Darvish and Prince Fielder and Matt Harrison and Martin Perez and Derek Holland and Mitch Moreland and Tanner Scheppers and Alexi Ogando and Jurickson Profar and Kevin Kouzmanoff and Joseph Ortiz and Jake Smolinski and Pedro Figueroa and Engel Beltre and you and I have seen the Rangers record drop to 30 games below .500 for the first time since October 6, 1985, when Texas fell to California, 6-5, a game in which Bobby Jones, the current 64-year-old assistant hitting coach on Ron Washington’s coaching staff, started for the Rangers in right field, and by the way when Jones was a rookie with Texas 11 years before that, it was more than a year after the Rangers last picked 1/1 in the amateur draft, and also more than a year after the Rangers’ pick in that draft, Houston-area high school lefthander David Clyde, made his big league debut, giving up one hit and seven walks in a five-inning effort against the Twins, and the one hit was a home run by Minnesota left fielder Mike Adams, no not that Mike Adams, and the way Colorado — which was 20 years away from existing when Texas last had the 1/1 pick and took David Clyde — is responding to the loss of Troy Tulowitzki and Carlos Gonzalez to season-ending surgery, winning five of its last eight to move two games ahead of Texas in overall record, the name David Clyde is going to start getting mentioned more and more around here, and if it’s cool with you I’d like to change the subject and point out that Phil Klein, after ugly results his first two times on the mound for Texas, has pitched six times with a sparkling 8-2-1-1-3-9 line and as long as we’re on the subject of Rangers rookies, in spite of the number who have been pushed to Arlington this year, in many cases well ahead of schedule, the Rangers still have the best composite minor league win-loss record in baseball this year, meaningless in some respects but not so insignificant when you consider that (1) Texas consistently fields some of the youngest farm clubs in baseball and (2) director of minor league operations Mike Daly said, “Development is the most important thing . . . it supersedes everything else . . . but at the end of the day, winning is important . . . we expect to win at the major league level . . . it’s good to put players in as many of those situations as possible at the minor league level first . . . winning within the framework of the development is significant” (thanks, Evan Grant [Dallas Morning News]), and you realize that even if this weren’t a year in which finding promise on the farm was a welcome distraction, there’s a lot of winning within the framework of the development going on and that’s cool, and read this really outstanding Peter Gammons article and let me know when you’ve finished it, after which you should reconsider writing Michael Choice off, and if you’re still skeptical, that’s fair, but take note that after a .237/.326/.329 (.655 OPS) post-demotion July run with AAA Round Rock in July, he’s hit .296/.420/.606 (1.026 OPS) with 17 RBI in 20 games, and he’s still just 24 so a little patience is probably warranted, and seriously, go read that Gammons article, and this was really cool, too, and thank you guys for the honor system donations, and don’t forget to Do it For Durrett, and Happy Birthday to Luke Jackson and Omar Beltre and B.J. Waszgis (who was no Chris Gimenez: Go get ’em with Tribe, CG) and also to Jon Daniels, born four years and two months after David Clyde debuted but eight years and two months before the Rangers were last 30 games under, and when Thad Levine tells MLB Network Radio “we feel as if we should walk into 2015 with the same level of optimism we went into 2014 with . . . we are trying to make smart moves now and will continue that this off-season and get back to out-scouting people rather than out-spending people [as we] retool things,” and we recognize that Yu and Prince and Matt and Martin and Derek (please, no more setbacks) and Mitch and Tanner and Alexi and Jurickson and Kevin and Joseph and Jake and Pedro and Engel, for the most part, should be healthy or at least a lot closer to full health next year, and in terms of baseball mental health so should you and I, then JD’s 38th birthday, at least from a baseball standpoint, should be a lot more satisfying than his 37th, and on August 24, 2015 we can all hope I can pass along birthday wishes in something other than irritating one-sentence fashion.

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