The beauty of 2009.

v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
.shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);}

 

The bad thing about this ridiculous run the Angels are on (eight
straight, 12 of 13, 22 of 28, 29 of 38) is that the Rangers, despite winning
five of six and 13 of 20, have fallen to 4.5 games back in the division, 3.5
games behind Boston in the Wild Card chase.

 

It’s the furthest out of first place Texas has been all season.

 

The good thing?  An organization
positioned to be stronger in 2010 and beyond is not only breaking in key young
players like Elvis Andrus, Derek Holland, Tommy Hunter, Taylor Teagarden, and Doug
Mathis, and maybe Neftali Feliz and Justin Smoak and Julio Borbon and a
rejuvenated Chris Davis, but breaking them in not as the 2007 Devil Rays
(66-96) but as a team that has yet to play a game that felt like it didn’t
really matter.

 

It’s a tricky time if you’re Jon Daniels, with payroll constraints
and a seller’s market and, now, a standings issue, as the trade deadline arrives
once more through the rotation.

 

Last night was a difficult loss, especially the way the
offense was once again victimized by a Baseball 101 game plan that a very good
young pitcher was able to execute (toolsy Luke Hochevar punched out 13 Rangers and
walked none in seven innings, quite the departure from his 6.1/2.5 rate this
season, and lifetime 5.3/3.0).  But Holland
will benefit long-term more from the fact that the game was one that Texas
needed than he would have if the club had been 12.5 games out, just as Hunter’s
win on Tuesday meant more because it came against Josh Beckett and kept the
Rangers within three games of the Angels as opposed to the mere novelty of
coinciding with Beckett taking the ball in the home half of each inning.

 

And I’ll say it again: the fact that Texas is where it is in the standings,
despite dramatic dropoffs from several key players and an epidemic offensive haplessness
most nights, is a lot more encouraging than if the club were 4.5 games out with
half the roster playing at an absolute peak, if not completely out of their
minds. 

 

I’m not writing 2009 off yet, in spite of the Angels’
persistent unconsciousness.  But even if Los
Angeles and Boston and New York don’t allow Texas to get any closer to the two
playoff spots at which the club has a shot, it’s a very good thing for this
franchise’s immediate future that every game this season, so far, has mattered.

 

 

You can read more from Jamey
Newberg
at www.NewbergReport.com.

 

1 Comment

You can’t lose what you don’t push into the middle. The Red Sox, Yankees, Rays and Angels are better with their starting pitching than the Rangers, no matter how good the story is. What if at this time next year, with the Angels being a year older and Hamilton and Kinsler not headed toward the Mendoza line, the Rangers are 4 games up at this time. Then you will have all these valuable chips again that you can use in a trade deadline deal.
Be patient. Hicks doesn’t have the money to pay a frontline starting pitcher and all the pitching has an option for 2010 or arbitration eligible for next year.
These prospects in the minors may never have successful major league careers, but the trade value for these young guys will only go up next year with good health.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 64 other followers

%d bloggers like this: