Starting strong.

Kris Benson is ready for activation.  Derek Holland is on the rotation watch.  But the Rangers’ starting five isn’t making
any room for either of them, and that’s just fine.

 

The last two times through the rotation, Texas starters have gone 6-1, 3.34.  In those 10 starts, they’re limiting the
opposition to a fairly punchless .251/.299/.357 slash line (the rough
equivalent of facing Ramon Hernandez every time up).  They’re only striking out a batter every
other inning, but still maintain a 2.4 K/BB by virtue of a dazzling rate of 1.89
walks per nine innings.  They’re throwing
nearly twice as many strikes as balls, and inducing 1.3 as many groundouts as
flyouts.

 

The average Rangers start over these last 10 games: 6.1
innings, six hits, two earned runs, one walk, and three strikeouts.  And 94 pitches (15 per inning), 59 for
strikes. 

 

Mariners skipper Don Wakamatsu, who was on the Texas coaching
staff when Kevin Millwood and Vicente Padilla arrived in 2006, said after
Millwood’s effort last night: “I think at the start of that game, Millwood was
probably as good as anyone I’ve seen this year, as far as command.  He was literally unhittable.  He topped out at 93 and kept our hitters
off-balance. . . . He really had both sides of plate working.  That’s probably as good as I’ve seen him since
I’ve known him over a six-year period.”

 

He could have said the exact same thing about Padilla
today. 

 

How much of the credit should go to Millwood, Padilla, Brandon
McCarthy, Matt Harrison, and Scott Feldman for the run they’re on now, and how
much should go to Mike Maddux, one of the best off-season acquisitions this
franchise has made in years, and how much should go to Jon Daniels and Nolan
Ryan and Andy Hawkins and former minor league pitching instructor Rick Adair (who
watched from the opposing dugout with Wakamatsu these last two days) and any
number of other executives and instructors driven to change this franchise’s
pitching fortunes is tough to say, and not all that important to sort out. 

 

The fact is that Texas
has found a solid groove right now, largely due to a surge in rotation
consistency, and that’s a very cool thing to be able to write.

 

You can read more from Jamey
Newberg
at www.NewbergReport.com.

1 Comment

That is a pretty cool thing to read too

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 64 other followers

%d bloggers like this: